What Is Adaptive Hiking?

What Is Adaptive Hiking

Adaptive hiking is one of the fastest-growing niche sports in the world. Adaptive hikers use all types of prostheses, wheelchairs, and other machinery to explore nature just like everyone else.

There are three major classifications of adaptive equipment: Prosthetic aids (examples include hand crutches, arm crutches, and forearm crutches), wheelchairs (also known as mobility devices), and other machinery (such as bicycles).

Here are some tips on how you can make sure your trip to the wilderness is safe for both you and those around you.

What is adaptive hiking

Adaptive hiking is a niche sport that’s growing in popularity, but it can be hard to find information on how to do it safely.The three major types of adaptive equipment are prosthetic aids (hand crutches, arm crutches, and forearm crutches), wheelchairs (mobility devices) and other machinery such as bicycles.

We’ve put together some tips for you on how to make sure your trip into the wilderness is safe for both you and those around you.

Adaptive hiking is one of the fastest-growing niche sports and it’s also one of the most diverse. You’ll find hikers using all types of prosthetic, wheelchairs and other machinery to explore nature.

Unlike typical hiking trips, adaptive hikers need to be more aware of their surroundings as there are those who depend on these devices for their mobility. Hikers must be sure to always take into consideration those with disabilities as they can’t necessarily see them as well as able-bodied individuals.

The three major classifications of adaptive equipment are prosthetic aids (hand crutches, arm crutches and forearm crutches), wheelchairs (mobility devices) and other machinery such as bicycles and people movers.

It’s important to make sure you’re familiar with the limitations and benefits of your specific piece of equipment before heading out into the wilderness.

How to have safe adventures with adaptive equipment

The equipment that adaptive hikers use can be tricky to get a feel for before heading out into the wilderness. The three main types of adaptive equipment are prosthetic aids, wheelchairs and other machinery such as bikes.

It’s important to make sure you’re familiar with the limitations and benefits of your specific piece of equipment before heading out into the wilderness.

The first thing to know is what your body needs in terms of energy, water, and protection from sun and heat. This means being sure to have enough food, water and sunscreen on any given day.

Make sure that there’s enough water- especially during warmer months when it can be hot or when you’ll be somewhere without a running water source- for everyone involved in the hike.

All hikers should be sure to carry a first-aid kit, though it’s especially important for those using adaptive equipment because minor accidents are more likely to occur.

Carrying your own first-aid kit is always a good idea but it’s best to have extra supplies if you’ll be with someone who will be using adaptive equipment.

If you’re going with someone who needs special equipment, make sure you can handle it if they need help.

Be careful when using machinery such as wheelchairs and bikes in wet areas or on steep inclines/declines. You’ll want to be aware of your surroundings at all times, whether you’re using adaptive equipment or not.

Tips for people who want to go on an adaptive hike

Make sure your hiking equipment is in good shape. Keep your prosthetic device lubricated and free of debris. Carry a spare set (or two) of batteries for your power-assisted devices like all-terrain wheelchairs, where it’s difficult to change the battery while you are underway.

Always have an emergency kit on hand. Carry food, water, bandages, antibiotic ointment, pain reliever, sunscreen, insect repellent, and lip balm with SPF protection.

Preparing for an adaptive hike

Continuing with tips for people who want to go on an adaptive hike:

When heading out into the wilderness or any unfamiliar territory, it is safe to assume that there will be challenges along the way. It is important to remain flexible and prepared for anything, whether it’s an unexpected obstacle or unplanned overnight stay.

Consider the equipment you bring with you.

Always pack more than you think you will need.

The last thing anyone wants on a hike is to run out of supplies in bad weather, at night, or in an emergency situation.

What Is Adaptive Hiking

Adaptive gear, including prosthetic aids, wheelchairs, and other machinery

Adaptive gear, including prosthetic aids, wheelchairs, and other machinery is used for adaptive hiking. Adaptive hikers use all types of prostheses, wheelchairs, and other machinery to explore nature just like everyone else.

There are three major classifications of adaptive equipment: Prosthetic aids (examples include hand crutches, arm crutches, and forearm crutches), wheelchairs (also known as mobility devices), and other machinery (such as bicycles).

Here are some tips on how you can make sure your trip to the wilderness is safe for both you and those around you.

The best way to keep from being a nuisance or hazard to yourself or others is by being mindful about the gear that you need to use.

Make sure you can get through any obstacles or obstructions on your path, such as logs and mud holes. Some options for this could be:

  • Always travel with a buddy (never go alone) to help clear paths and watch out for hazards like snakes and other critters that may cause harm.
  • Be prepared and know that you will probably get wet feet and muddy legs, but it is of the utmost importance that you do not get your prosthesis wet. If it does get wet, dry it out before putting it back on — the last thing you want to do is put a wet prosthesis back on and cause harm to yourself (such as blisters, sores, and other maladies).
  • If you are in an environment with lots of poison ivy or other noxious plants, be aware that they can also damage your prosthesis if they get on it while wet. So always make sure to check yourself for them before getting back into the routine (such as when you are getting back into your wheelchair).

Although the tips above are a good starting point to keep you from hurting yourself, there is more information out there if you want to know more.

Conclusion

Adaptive hiking is one of the fastest-growing niche sports in the world. Adaptive hikers use all types of prostheses, wheelchairs, and other machinery to explore nature just like everyone else. The best way to keep from being a nuisance or hazard to yourself or others is by being mindful about the gear that you need to use when going on an adaptive hike.

References : Adaptive hiking programs

John Oakley

Hi, I am John Oakley- The Guy behind this site. I am an avid hiker and long distance walker. I love to experiment with new gear for hiking and walking and this site is a result of my passion for reviewing and checking the best walking shoes and hiking gear.

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